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Archive for the ‘Fantasy Draft’ Category

I had a lot of trouble writing up this post. I could go on about how I think his content is deeply symbolic and his flowfz05g doesn’t mimic any predecessing artist that I’m familiar with. I could talk about what Fantastic, Vol 2 has meant to me over the past three years. I could try to articulate in well-read terms exactly what it is about his occupation of a song that draws and keeps my attention and why exactly that attention seemingly turns to fascination every time. But, much like the previous sentences, they would likely come across carrying just a fraction of the gravity that I intend them to. There are people who know Baatin‘s work much deeper than I do and people who knew the man personally, not just through the headphones and speakers that I’ve interpreted him with. So I’ll leave the in-depth analysis about the man himself alone. However, I will share my thoughts on how he’s influenced my views on death and spirituality and the optimism he’s brought me.

baatin3-2I want to preface this that I’ve never spoken to anyone who has known him. This is entirely based on a couple of stories I’ve read online and the impression his lyrics have left on me. To paraphrase to the ultimate degree, Baatin struggled with his mental health towards the end of his life. He was found dead in his apartment at 35. If there was truth to his thoughts on spirituality, which I wholly believe there was, then those final moments, however many of them there were, spent alone in his apartment moving towards death must have been cripplingly powerful. This is just my assumption, but in the shoes of a man facing the definition of mortality secured by a true belief in a paradise, Baatin may have felt degrees of acceptance and comfort far surpassing anything that I have ever felt in my life. But I hope to someday. Because whether you have spiritual conviction, doubt, or any combination of the two, I like to think we universally would like to make our exit consoled by the appreciation for what has happened and/or the hopes for what is about to happen. I think, and it doesn’t take a whole lot of optimism to convince myself of this, that Baatin was healthily considering both.

Soul Intense Records

  1. J Dilla
  2. Andre 3000
  3. Snoop Dogg
  4. Biggie Smalls
  5. Guru
  6. Pete Rock Method Man
  7. Baatin
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Scratching, dancing, balling. What’s better?

I think this pick needs little explanation given who I have thus far signed to my label, but I am going to justify it anyways. AZ and Nas flow better together than a stream and a slope. Both also work tremendously with DJ Premier and (the new Partners In Rhyme acquisition) Pete Rock. So, that quadrilateral would already force you into listening from a music box. Now, imagine Q-Tip and AZ spitting back-to-back verses over a Pete Rock beat with DJ Premier scratching in hooks, Nas on-deck, Common in the hole, and Black Thought in the dugout.

If you aren’t fully familiar with the flowing finesse that AZ possesses, listen to these:

Partners In Rhyme:
1. DJ Premier
2. Q-Tip
3. Nas
4. Common
5. Method Man Pete Rock
6. Black Thought
7. AZ

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25-Nights-For-Nujabes-Night-10

It doesn’t matter how you pronounce his name, as long as you know who he was. Nujabes transcended cultural boundaries with his production. So much so, that it now has near universal acclaim across all of the leading institutes of hip hop. His production, airyatmosphericetherealtear-jerking, hits on a level very rarely touched through the medium of hip hop. He was the Japanese Dilla, which gains even more significance when you learn that they were born on the same exact day (February 7, 1974). His beats rarely require vocals, but he has worked with the perfect artists to do his music right. As I’m writing this I realize that there’s no way I could ever do a man like Nujabes any bit of justice. It’s so hard to articulate his music without painting it as boring, but I’ll try. His music makes me feel warm, calm, and just…happy. The only rappers that could spit over his beats sound dream-like themselves, and you may begin to realize that he in no way fits with the style that I have been molding with my previous draft choices.

Nujabes can produce nostalgia. I understand how confusing that can sound, but you’ll find that “nostalgic” quite possibly is the only word to describe his sound. On a more concrete note, his music is literally nostalgic to me. Not only have I been listening to him for a long while, but he is responsible for the majority of the soundtrack of the critically acclaimed anime Samurai Champloo. This show is an old favorite, showcasing tons of original work by Nujabes…not to mention its just a fantastic show full of ethics, action, comedy and life lessons. 

People’s Chomp now stands as this:

RZA

MF DOOM

SLUG

JOEY BADA$$

BIG L

GHOSTFACE KILLAH

NUJABES

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25-Nights-For-Nujabes-Night-10

It doesn’t matter how you pronounce his name, as long as you know who he was. Nujabes transcended cultural boundaries with his production. So much so, that it now has near universal acclaim across all of the leading institutes of hip hop. His production, airy, atmospheric, ethereal, tear-jerking, hits on a level very rarely touched through the medium of hip hop. He was the Japanese Dilla, which gains even more significance when you learn that they were born on the same exact day (February 7, 1974). His beats rarely require vocals, but he has worked with the perfect artists to do his music right. As I’m writing this I realize that there’s no way I could ever do a man like Nujabes any bit of justice. It’s so hard to articulate his music without painting it as boring, but I’ll try. His music makes me feel warm, calm, and just…happy. The only rappers that could spit over his beats sound dream-like themselves, and you may begin to realize that he in no way fits with the style that I have been molding with my previous draft choices.

Nujabes can produce nostalgia. I understand how confusing that can sound, but you’ll find that “nostalgic” quite possibly is the only word to describe his sound. On a more concrete note, his music is literally nostalgic to me. Not only have I been listening to him for a long while, but he is responsible for the majority of the soundtrack of the critically acclaimed anime Samurai Champloo. This show is an old favorite, showcasing tons of original work by Nujabes…not to mention its just a fantastic show full of ethics, action, comedy and life lessons. 

People’s Chomp now stands as this:

RZA

MF DOOM

SLUG

JOEY BADA$$

BIG L

GHOSTFACE KILLAH

NUJABES

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Put on any Roots song and this GIF will be perfect

My sixth round pick took little thought. I had to take Black Thought. If you have ever so much as shuffled through The Roots’ discography, you can confirm the Thought’s adaptability. The Roots have so many different vibes, album to album, but Black Thought is never fazed. This truth holds lyrically too; he’s political and simultaneously hip, reflective and forward-thinking, big picture and egoistic. He wants to critique the world and change your view of life, while making sure you know he’s the best at doing it.

His rhyming is Eminem-esque at times; I have come to appreciate the lack of any regard he has for “true” pronunciation. He treats words as clay, molding them to the shape and style he pleases, giving preferences to certain syllabus – whatever it takes to keep his message intact while making his lines bounce. Especially after trading for Pete Rock, Black Thought is the perfect addition to the Partners In Rhyme label.

I made a mix of some of my favorite Black Thought verses, which exemplify his verbal characteristics I describe above:

Partners in Rhyme
1. DJ Premier
2. Q-Tip
3. Nas
4. Common
5. Method Man  Pete Rock
6. Black Thought

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photo 1 photo 2 (1)

Above you’ll see the draft order of rounds 4-6, and below check out the lineups as they are. The draft was conducted in a snake manner.

See why each pick was made HERE!  *Click “Newer Posts” to continue through the draft

NOTE: A trade has been made — Soul Intense Records trades Pete Rock to Partners in Rhyme for Method Man. They also swapped their 7th Round picks as part of the deal.

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So this is why I took Pete Rock:

Just a few weeks ago I had a moving experience listening to The Main Ingredient and I came away from it with no doubt that I had found my 6th round pick. Just the most perfect mid-round steal. However:

I already have J Dilla. Seeing that Pete Rock was the pinnacle of influence on Dilla’s development and career, I found myself with two giants of the game on the same team, playing the same position.

This is why I had to work out this trade. I had such a good thing going, pairing rappers with Dilla beats, conceiving the greatest possible collaborations. Adding Pete Rock to the squad disrupts the whole process. The distribution of wealth was undeserved for both. I didn’t find it worth the mental strain of weighing Dilla vs. Rock when reasoning for my seventh, eighth, ninth, and so on, round picks.  It’s a great problem to have, I know, so that’s why I’m dealing with it with a great deal of content.

This is how the deal breaks down:

Soul Intense Records (artists to trade)

   Pete Rock
   7th Round Second Pick

Partners in Rhyme (artists to trade)

   Method Man
   7th Round First Pick

So I just traded Pete Rock for Method Man, which is justifiable in itself, but out of respect I wanted to further justify my shipping of Pete, so I included a clause which would flip sMiles’ and my 7th round picks.  So with this move I’ve 1) given J Dilla executive power, 2) added Method Man to the squad, and 3) reserved the first pick of the next round. I’m happy.

F1.  “Bring the Pain”

F2. “Y.O.U.”

F3. “House of Flying Daggers” (prod. J Dilla)

Now, imagine Method Man on this Dilla beat, with J Dilla rapping too!:

Soul Intense Records

  1. J Dilla
  2. Andre 3000
  3. Snoop Dogg
  4. Biggie Smalls
  5. Guru
  6. Pete Rock Method Man

 

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BigKRIT011013

With the addition of the charismatic Chance, I’m going back to my roots of story telling, conscious lyrics, and production.  I am proud to introduce Big Krit as the next signee to We B. Da Boyz.

I first heard Krit back in 2010.  At the time, I was impressed with the young rapper from Mississippi, but I wasn’t quite aware of much of a follower I would soon become.  The first track that struck me was “I Gotta Stay”, a minimalist song without any major kicks, or layering.  The song was incredibly honest, and as such, I felt that I had been admitted into a truly genuine moment of Krit’s.  Little did I know, however, that honesty was a trait inherent to Krit’s music and persona.

In addition to Krit’s incredible lyrical ability, he’s also a very talented producer, as he self-produces nearly all of his work.  Many of his beats are jazz influenced, yet to say they  have only one ancestor is absurd, as his albums feature an eclectic collection of instrumentals.  His beats are versatile, and the beauty of it, is that each different vibe brings out an alternate side of the man who made them.  Krit can bang, he can reminisce, and he can hustle.

As a member of We B. Da Boyz, Krit brings his impeccable diction, perspective, hustle, and beats – all of which are traits that we pride ourselves on.

One of the most lyrical songs I have ever heard.  Truly incredible, and entirely the product of Krit’s genius.

Kind of a corny music video, but still terrific.

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ghostfacekillah

I smell the essence of Wu. In my humble opinion (we all know it is highly debatable), I just snagged the best rapper in Wu-Tang. The most consistent success with a solo career, and perhaps the best storytelling MC in history, Ghostface Killah has become a favorite of mine, and I couldn’t dishonor him by taking him any later than I already did. RZA and Ghostface are two drops from the same water bucket, and when they meet the rest of my team, we’ll get to the boiling.

The People’s Chomp

1. RZA

2. MF DOOM

3. Slug

4. Joey Bada$$

5. Big L

6. Ghostface Killah

Also, I’m incredibly ready to hear that MF DOOM and Ghost have a project coming up that I hope will drop soon. They’ve dabbled in the past, but let’s see what heights we reach now.

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Image

Alright, as of now We B. Da Boyz, as a label, has a stash of elite producers and story tellers; however, now I’m going to go in a slightly alternate route.  Even with all the fascinating and complex minds on We B. Da Boyz, you can never have too many, and assuch, I’d like to introduce the most unique persona yet: Chance The Rapper.  Although Chance doesn’t paint vivid tales as the previous draftees, it’s no fault of his, for that’s just not the way he raps.  Instead, Chance seems to just let a stream of consciousness hit him, and  he allows himself to run with it.  By doing so, he lets the listener into his world through brief, and scattered glimpses intohis life that all happen to share a common denominator.  Chance doesn’t produce his own music, but that’s irrelevant, for given the number of beatsmiths already on the label, it’d be a somewhat repetitive talent.

What I find so appealing about Chance, is the fact that he is incredibly unique. He has a dynamic, young and energetic personality, all the while still maintaining an introspective perspective. In addition his voice is incredibly charismatic – combining shouting, rapping, and onomatopoeia into song. Overall he brings a vibe to his music that I haven’t heard in my time listening to hip hop, and I’m excited as to seewhere it goes.  In a label with vets like Kanye and Em, Chance would bring an element of untapped youth into their music, while still upholding a degree of maturity reserved for more established artists.  Also, although Eminem tries, no one on my label can sing a hook to save their life – a niche that Chance would absolutely hold down.

Current Lineup:

1) Kanye West

2) J. Cole

3) Eminem

4) Kendrick Lamar

5) Chance The Rapper

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