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Posts Tagged ‘-Dilla Sundays’

I’m not going to make you guess who sampled this  — Dilla did (the most familiar sample appearing at 1:00). This song is pretty great, but the one that Jay Dee creates with this track has actually brought tears to my eyes.

Happy Dilla Sunday everyone,

trondon

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Peep these dudes vibing to the sickest song existing.

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A beautiful Dilla Sunday it is. I just listened to this album, Art Official Intelligence: Mosaic Thump, this Friday while painting for a couple hours. The one hour and the six minutes and the forty-six seconds I listened to it was definitely the highlight of that pair of hours.  The whole album is gold, with this being most specifically the most golden. Thank you, Jay Dee, for consistently and so generously upping everyone’s game with who you associate, regardless of whether or not they’re already concrete legends of hip hop, as De La Soul undeniably is.

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It seems that everything he touches just turns to gold. You just have to go with your gut and hear this one.

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The thing that I admire most, or I should say one of the things, is that J Dilla has introduced me to so many artists that as an individual growing up this day and age I may not have been introduced on my own. There’s heaping piles of garbage creeping through miles of commercial radio airwaves. He has saved me from slipping into the trap that is today’s music scene, no pun intended. This song is a great example. I don’t know if I’d have listened to Phat Kat if it wasn’t for their 1999 Dedication to the Suckers collaboration, which is a coincidentally titled project given what I just scribed sentences previous.

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You might recognize this as “Track 18” from J Dilla‘s beat tape numero uno. Steve Spacek, a man from London, Earth, wished to work with Dilla and this is the beat that he desired. I don’t blame him. He went over the Jay Dee beat in 2005 for his album Spaceshift. I draw upon a facinating piece from the Stones Throw site for the following Spacek quote:

“I was recording my solo project in Hollywood, just around the corner from where Dee and Common lived. We met up at his place, rolled a blunt end got straight down to it. It was quite surreal, actually. Myself, [manager] Mr French and Leon Were were rolling together that afternoon. I had met Jay briefly a few times before in London, but had never really hung out in a chilled environment. So I say to him, “Jay man, just bless me with something for my album.” And he’s like, “Yo, Spacek, I don’t know if I have anything ready for you now,” picking up the remote control for his DAT machine. So he’s flicking through this tape, then he stops, pulls out the DAT and exchanges it for another and resumes flicking through. Not even a couple of minutes have passed when he lands on the Billy Paul thing, looks up at me and just lets it roll. As soon as I hear it, what with the “yeh-yeh-yeh” vocal going through, I knew that it was the one. We hung out for a little longer, smoked a bit more, then I heeded back to French’s gaff to start writing. A few verses and a hook later, along with a couple of chops/edits on the two track, and “Dollar” was done. That afternoon was the last I saw of Jay.”

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This song is great for when you want to procrastinate and quote Busta Rhymes at the same time. I hope everyone is enjoying their Dilla Sunday. I know I am, despite the fact that I should be studying for my looming finals. I got to learn up on my philosophy of religion, you know what I mean? Time to hit the books.

Not right now.

Download Dillagence

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Original

J Dilla, rock, rock on. Beatspill, rock, rock on. All you people, rock, rock on. Dilla Sundays, rock, rock on. Thanks for listening, rock, rock on.  Dilla’s 2007 re-issue of Ruff Draft had both these versions of “Shouts”, showing love and appreciation to the people in his life who helped him become on of the most influential and endeared musicians of all time. It’s funny, I feel as though everyone involved in this must reciprocate these feelings on such a deeper level. Here’s a breakdown of who is involved in order of appearance.

Original:

Common, CL Smooth, Pete Rock, Frank-n-Dank, Almighty Dreadnaughtz, Mr. Porter, Proof, Busta Rhymes and Flipmode Squad, Groove Attack, Karriem Riggins, Bling47, Young RJ, Phat Kat, and Ghostly International

Alternative:

A Tribe Called Quest, Common, Mrs. Yancey, Loot Pack (Madlib, Wildchild, and DJ Romes), Calloway, Guilty Simpson, P-Dub, Fat Killahz, Secret City, Proof, S.C.*, Slum Village, Royce da 5’9″, Tex Murda, Philly Frank, D’Angelo, Redman, Big Fuzz, Nas, The Neptunes, White Boy*, Mike Move*, BlackStar, and Jurassic 5

*Identity unconfirmed

Alternative

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Listen to this on this beautiful Sunday aftermorning. You’ll like the way it sounds. I guarantee it.

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I can’t find the sample for this one but it doesn’t matter. I was just listening to Dilla‘s “This is It” with sMiles and we were talking about how he titles his tracks with the most appropriately sounding phrases. I can picture Dilla sitting back after finalizing it and saying “This is it.” Because frankly, it is. “Nothing Like This” is similar. I haven’t heard anything similar. He even says “There is nothing like this. I’ve never felt quite like this.” Frankly, there isn’t and I haven’t. This song is a trance. I’ve listened to the original and the instrumental forth and back about four times each, right up until the point that I’ve written this sentence.  I just read this interview and Just Blaze admitted that at first he didn’t recognize the power of this song, stating, “…when I was listening to it, I just skipped past that song like, ‘He ain’t rapping … Then it hit me. It was hypnotic.'”  I feel him on this. If you let yourself be taken by this song you’ll find yourself intrigued to the point of wanting to understand something that won’t ever be explained. I feel like when the argument is being made for Dilla as the greatest of all time this would be a prime example of his range and his ability to span genres and switch up the sound while still keeping the his essence present.

“You breathe life into me.  But I think I’m in too deep.”

Thanks to Stones Throw for the insight

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