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Posts Tagged ‘Dilla’

“It’s crazy how I have so much pride in something that I had such a minuscule role in making great” – jolowitz. Couldn’t have set it better…without…….myself.

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Good morning? Best morning.

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What I walk through Boston with.

Trying to step in line with the tempo is other-worldly and I highly recommend it.

Kanye was right when he called Dilla a drum god.

Off Champion Sound

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25-Nights-For-Nujabes-Night-10

It doesn’t matter how you pronounce his name, as long as you know who he was. Nujabes transcended cultural boundaries with his production. So much so, that it now has near universal acclaim across all of the leading institutes of hip hop. His production, airy, atmospheric, ethereal, tear-jerking, hits on a level very rarely touched through the medium of hip hop. He was the Japanese Dilla, which gains even more significance when you learn that they were born on the same exact day (February 7, 1974). His beats rarely require vocals, but he has worked with the perfect artists to do his music right. As I’m writing this I realize that there’s no way I could ever do a man like Nujabes any bit of justice. It’s so hard to articulate his music without painting it as boring, but I’ll try. His music makes me feel warm, calm, and just…happy. The only rappers that could spit over his beats sound dream-like themselves, and you may begin to realize that he in no way fits with the style that I have been molding with my previous draft choices.

Nujabes can produce nostalgia. I understand how confusing that can sound, but you’ll find that “nostalgic” quite possibly is the only word to describe his sound. On a more concrete note, his music is literally nostalgic to me. Not only have I been listening to him for a long while, but he is responsible for the majority of the soundtrack of the critically acclaimed anime Samurai Champloo. This show is an old favorite, showcasing tons of original work by Nujabes…not to mention its just a fantastic show full of ethics, action, comedy and life lessons. 

People’s Chomp now stands as this:

RZA

MF DOOM

SLUG

JOEY BADA$$

BIG L

GHOSTFACE KILLAH

NUJABES

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It’s Dilla Sunday, and this song is exactly how I feel today. Started out quiet and not too different, but then it grew and bloomed into a memorable one. I cooked up the biggest meal I ever have today, and it came out pretty amazing. Bumped this jam after and felt like I could touch the sky.

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For a while I had trouble getting used to second generation Slum Village. I respect Elzhi as a rapper and don’t doubt his talent at all, but the shoes just seem impossibly big to fill. The video for this song really helped me understand just why he was the chosen one to step in and keep Slum going. The imagery of this video is powerful and moving, reminding me just how far removed I am from the Detroit hip hop scene of the 90s and early 00s and to be honest it makes me feel left out. But it would be ridiculous not to see the silver lining that is being a fan. I like to think I’m grown but to be honest I’m still just a kid and to see Elzhi in these old clips doing what he does best but just not knowing it yet is both inspiring and awing.  It’s a very humanizing video, with clips of T3, Baatin, Dilla, Eminem, Royce, and Proof, among many others, before the fame, before the money, back when everyone was just trying to do what they loved to do: make music. Some of them made it, others just became fans who are able of drawing on memories, like the few in this video, but with a realistic accuracy that can only be known by those who were there and saw what happened at Mau­rice Mal­one’s Hip Hop Shop back in the day.

Mixtape Download: Elmatic (2011)

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Phlo Deli is a rising young artist out of High Point, North Carolina who has been featured on Beatspill before in the form of his collaboration with C. Pitt, Bonafide & Skitz – “Ancient History”. This particular track, a going-over, if you will, of J Dilla’s track “Vibeout” and he truly impresses with his lyricism, and its even more strongly emphasized with the sounds of the great producer. Through and through, this is a great track, showcasing this guy’s potential. Stay tuned for his upcoming mixtape The Wackness. 

Instrumental of J Dilla’s “Vibeout”

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Here’s a late Dilla Sunday post. It’s late because I was driving home from Portland, Maine, a ride in which I listened to ample Dilla productions. This is a Slum Village remix, featuring Detroit soul songsman Dwele, of Rhian Benson‘s 2003 hit “Say How I Feel“.  If I was an artist, I don’t know if I’d be happy if Dilla remixed one of my songs. On one hand, it would sound much iller. On the other, he would completely show me up.  I shouldn’t say completely, as Benson’s original is very good in its own respect. I think I’d still be cool with it.

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Just some beautiful, sunny day Jay Dee for your snowy Sunday. Vibe.

Off of Old Donuts (Unreleased)

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I followed the direction of many current J Dilla lovers by backtracking through my library to find which ones had been blessed by Dilla’s art.  In our interview with Tiger Speak, drummer and producer Matt Phenix said that after discovering the producer’s talent, he began searching through hip hop songs he already loved to find that an incredible amount had been influenced, at least in part, by Dilla’s magic.  Common‘s “The Light” became one of those awesome discoveries for me, with it being one of my favorite Common tracks.  It was crazy to find out that the slick, sleek, smooth, soothing beat came from the skill of Jay Dee – although, it was in no way surprising.  His talent is remarkable; his ability to build sounds of every style and any mood is almost silly.  It is also a treat whenever one can hear Dilla scratching on a beat.

The track is from Common’s must have album, Like Water For Chocolateand much credit must be given to Bobby Caldwell for the amazing sample.

Note: I know “The Light” is a fairly well known song, but what a shame it would be if a single hip hop love overlooked it.

Note #2: Am I the only one that hears “The 80‘s” beat from Old Donuts playing out the last fifteen or so seconds of the song?  Quite random.

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